Deadly Nightshade
by Victor J. Banis

A Review


Read the full review at reviewsbyjessewave.blogspot.com

Rating: 5 out of 5

When Homicide Detective Tom Danzel first saw his new gay partner Stanley Korski who is described as &qout;small for a cop, five eight max, with oversized hands and feet that gave him an almost clownish look, and a baby face ... a Kewpie doll mouth, so red it didn't look natural," Tom wondered "how did he get on the Force in the first place? He must get carded every time he steps into a bar". Tom on the other hand was exactly what one would expect the typical homicide detective in this story to look like - tall, very masculine, Neanderthal. His best asset? Being almost as excessively well endowed as the first victim who was often fondly referred to as "the baseball bat." :)

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Victor J. Banis is one terrific writer and I wonder how he escaped my notice until now because he writes the type of stories I love to read - murder mysteries with a twist, tightly written prose, very funny dialogue that is sometimes ironic, and characters that are so three dimensional that I can imagine them walking into any room. If you love the genre you can't miss Deadly Nightshade.

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Reviewed by Jessewave





A Review


Read the full review at fallenangelreviews.com


Rating: 4 Angels

When a man is shot to death in his San Francisco apartment building and witnesses say that the killer is a woman but ... not, the police are convinced they have a killer drag queen on their hands. Veteran homicide detective Tom Danzel and rookie Stanley Korski have been unexpectedly paired together to solve the case and to apprehend the killer. Tom is straight and is even mildly homophobic, and he is horrified to be paired with the swishy Stanley. Surely this is a partnership made in hell, but with the police department's it-takes-a-queer-to-catch-a-queer mentality, there is nothing he can do about it but suffer.

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The murder mystery that this story revolves around is just as interesting as the dysfunctional relationship between the main characters. Throughout the story, we are given glimpses into the mind of the killer. They are enough to make the reader think that they know the identity of the villain throughout the story, so the actual revelation towards the end makes for an agreeable twist. The final identification of the murderer is no big surprise, but the journey the reader takes to make the discovery makes this story well worth a read.


Reviewed by Whitney





A Review



Read the full review at elisa-rolle.livejournal.com

This is probably one of the less "dreamy" book I read by Victor J. Banis, means that it's pretty down to earth and direct and open, but probably also among my favorite, Lola Dances still has the first place, but this one is very near. I like Victor J. Banis' style, but one thing I almost always regretted, that in the end the two main characters don't walk toward the sunset together; only Lola did, and this is the reason since she is first on my list. Since Deadly Nightshade is only first on a series with the same characters, well, it's not exactly that you will find an happily ever after in there, but it's really close, and I have to say that the closing scene is quite romantic.

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Probably the main character of the book is Stanley, with his quirk behavior, and his way to investigate, judging a suspect by the way he furnishes the house or chooses the curtains, but who stole my heart is Tom. I'm really interested in seeing how he evolves in the future books.



Reviewed by: Elisa







Disclaimer: Reviewers may have received copies of the book from either the author or the publisher but otherwise were not paid for their reviews.